Creating Your Own Medicinal Herb Garden

Medicinal Herb Gardens

Medicinal Herb Gardens are a rich resource for ingredients used in 

developing a more natural remedy for what ails you. Not only do they allow you to avoid synthetic drugs, but many are often considered vital sources of nutrition. Several herbs have therapeutic qualities rather than treating acute conditions through the production of teas, ointments, salves, and tinctures, which unlock the latent abilities of these herbs. 


Most people choose to grow a medicinal herb garden to promote health and wellness throughout their household. It's a safer, more natural way to boost their immune system and a method to avoid conventional treatments for several conditions. The process of growing and maintaining a garden in itself is proven to help reduce stress and improve mental health! 


Choosing A Location

When choosing the location to grow your herbs, they typically require two main components - well-drained soil and sunlight. Ideally, any area you choose for your new herb garden will have a minimum of six hours of direct sunlight a day. The best thing about a herb garden is that the space is remarkably scalable. You can have a large plot of land in your yard, a Garden Tower on your deck or patio, flower pots on your window sill or my personal favourite, an Aerogarden in your Kitchen!



The Garden Tower allows you to have an enormous garden in a tiny fraction of the space required! Ideal for small yards or even apartment dwellers, this planter supports up to 50 plants at a time in only 4.5 sqft of space! This all-in-one unit uses composted materials from your home to provide nutrients to your plants. The best part is the Garden Tower was designed, developed and manufactured right here in North America! Using 100% Recycled, Food Grade Plastics that are 100% BPA Free!

The Aerogarden is a complete Hydroponic Indoor Garden System that you can set up almost anywhere! It doesn't get any simpler than this to create your own fresh indoor herb garden. Using small pre-filled disks, you can grow many different herbs that can move outside or into other pots as they mature. Not to mention the unit filters the air and circulates the aroma for a cleaner, fresher environment in your home!


Things to Consider

Once you've chosen a location and method you want to grow your medicinal herb garden, it's time to consider a few other potential considerations. The scale of your herb garden will depend primarily on how many people and herbs you're planning to support! It's vital to make efficient use of your space when planting, and remember to take advantage of vertical space and staggered starting times!


Finally, it's time to start thinking about what Medicinal Herbs you'll plant in your garden! You've got hundreds of options, each with its list of pros and cons. You'll have to consider which options work best in your Growing Zone and meet your family's needs! It's also important to consider starting on a small scale and slowly building up your inventory over a few years instead of trying to start everything at once!


Choosing Your Herbs

When choosing your herbs, try to pick all-encompassing options that aren't only considered medical herbs but can be used as culinary considerations as well! Some great starter herbs include Basil, Mint, and Garlic. They're all relatively easy to grow from seed/clove, and there is a ton of information online to support your appetite for knowledge. Not only can these options be used to promote health and wellness, but they add another whole dimension to your cooking when used correctly!


Use the plant profiles in the tabs below to figure out which herbs will be most beneficial to you and your family, and try to add a couple more each year!

Basil


AKA

Common Basil


Common Uses

Take orally for Stomach Spasms, Loss of Appetite, Intestinal Gas, Kidney Conditions, Fluid Retention and Head Colds.

Use topically for Snake Bites, Insect Bites, Warts and Worm Infections.

Women use Basil to promote blood circulation and breast milk production before and after pregnancy. 

Some use it as an all-natural gargle like Scope.

Basil is a primary flavouring agent in cooking.


Active Ingredients

Basil is a good source of Vitamin C, Calcium, Magnesium, Potassium and Iron.


How to Use

Use Basil as a flavouring in cooking or oil form.


Safety Concerns

Basil is typically safe for cooking and as a medicine for short-term situations but should be limited in duration.


Click Here to Read the Plant Profile!

Calendula 


AKA

Calendule, Garden Marigold, Pot Marigold, English Garden Marigold, Gold-Bloom and Marigold


Common Uses

Take orally to prevent Muscle Spasms, Start Menstrual Periods, and Reduce Fever, treats Sore Mouth and Throat, Cancer, Menstrual Cramps, as well as Stomach Ulcers.

Use topically reduce pain and swelling on the skin and for nosebleeds, varicose veins, hemorrhoids, proctitis and conjunctivitis.


Active Ingredients

Calendula contains Saponins, Triterpenes, Flavonoids, Steroids, Tannins, Amino Acids, Polysaccharides and Essential Oils.


How to Use

Use Calendula as an oil, balm, lotion or salve.


Safety Concerns

Calendula is typically safe for most people when taken orally or topically. Pregnant women should avoid Calendula as it may cause miscarriage or other fetal harm.


Click Here to Read the Plant Profile!

Cayenne


AKA

Chili Pepper, Jalapeno and Hot Pepper


Common Uses

Taken orally to Boost Metabolism, Reduce Hunger, Lower Blood Pressure, Aid Digestive Health, Relieve Pain, Improve Psoriasis and Reduce Cancer Risk.


Active Ingredients

Cayenne contains Capsaicin.


How to Use

Use Cayenne as a cooking aide, making it easy to add to your diet.


Safety Concerns

Cayenne may leave a burning sensation temporarily in your mouth but is safe for consumption at any age.


Click Here to Read the Plant Profile!

Chamomile

 

AKA

German Chamomile, Wild Chamomile and Pin Heads


Common Uses

Take orally for Intestinal Gas, Motion Sickness, Hay Fever, Stuffy Nose, Diarrhea, ADHD, Fibromyalgia, Anxiety, Restlessness, Indigestion, Cramps and Colic.

Use topically for Hemorrhoids, Breast Tenderness, Skin Irritations and Gum Disease.

Inhale Chamomile to treat irritation of the Respiratory Tract and Common Cold.

Chamomile is a common flavouring in Food and Beverages, as well as Cosmetics, Mouthwash and Soap.


Active Ingredients

Chamomile contains Terpenoids and Flavonoids.


How to Use

Use Chamomile as a tea, salve, balm or lotion and aromatherapy.


Safety Concerns

Chamomile is safe as a food ingredient and to be used as medicine for up to 8 weeks. It can cause allergic reactions as it's a member of the ragweed family, also may irritate if it gets in the eyes. 


DOESN'T MIX WITH BIRTH CONTROL


Click Here to Read the Plant Profile!

Comfrey



AKA

Knitbone, Common Comfrey, Black Root, Bruisewort, Gum Plant and Healing Herb


Common Uses

Taken orally as a tea for Ulcers, Upset Stomach, Menstrual Periods, Bloody Urine, Diarrhea, Bronchitis, Angina, Pleuritis and gargled for Gum Disease and Sore Throat.

Apply Comfrey to the skin as a salve for Fractures, Gout, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Wounds, Bruises and Joint Inflammation.


Active Ingredients

Comfrey contains Allantoin and Rosmarinic Acid.


How to Use

Use Comfrey as a tea or salve. 


Safety Concerns

Comfrey is considered safe for use for up to 10 days as a salve. It's not recommended for oral consumption as it contains Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids, which are highly toxic to people. Avoid if pregnant.


Click Here to Read the Plant Profile!

Dandelion


AKA

Common Dandelion, Blowball, Wild Endive and Taraxacum


Common Uses

Take orally for Tonsillitis, Heart Failure, Loss of Appetite, Upset Stomach, Intestinal Gas, Arthritis and Joint Pain, Eczema, Gallstones and Improving Bile Flow. 

Dandelion is helpful in increase Urine Production, Laxative and a Tonic for Circulation, Blood and Digestion. 

Others use Dandelion to Treat Infection, Urinary Tract Infections and Cancer.

Dandelion Greens go well in Salads. It's also frequently used in Wine, Teas and Soups.


Active Ingredients

Dandelion is a good source of Vitamin A, B, C, E and K, Iron, Calcium and Magnesium.


How to Use

Use Dandelion as a Green in Salads, Tea, Soups and Wine.


Safety Concerns

Dandelion is typically safe for cooking. May cause allergic reactions as it's part of the Ragweed family.


Click Here to Read the Plant Profile!

Echinacea



AKA

American Cone Flower, Snakeroot, and Scurvy Root


Common Uses

Take orally for Yeast Infections, HPV, HIV/AIDS, Herpes, Septicemia, Syphilis, Ear, Nose and Throat Infections and the Common Cold, among many others.

Echinacea is one of the most universally beneficial herbal remedies currently known.


Active Ingredients

Echinacea contains Flavonoids, Cichoric Acid and Rosmarinic Acid.


How to Use

Use Echinacea as Tea, Juice or Tablets.


Safety Concerns

Echinacea is known to cause minor side effects like nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, dry mouth and headache. May cause allergic reactions as it's part of the Ragweed family. Do not take longer than ten days at a time.


Click Here to Read the Plant Profile!

Garlic



AKA

Ail, Stinking Rose, Serpent Garlic, Common Garlic and Allii Sativi Bulbus


Common Uses

Take orally for Heart and Blood System Issues, Preventative Maintenace for Several Cancers and a long list of Syndromes, Disorders and Inflammations.

Apply Garlic topically to treat Fungal Infections, Warts and Corns, as well as Hair Loss and Thrush.

Insert Garlic into your Vagina for Yeast Infections.

Fresh Garlic, Garlic Oil and Garlic Powder add flavour to your cooking.


Active Ingredients

Garlic contains Vitamin B1, B6, C, Selenium, Calcium, Copper, Potassium, Phosphorous and Iron.


How to Use

Use Garlic by the Clove as Oil or Powder when cooking.


Safety Concerns

Avoid large amounts of Garlic for Children.


Click Here to Read the Plant Profile!

Lavender


AKA

Common Lavender


Common Uses

Take orally for Restlessness, Insomnia, Anxiety, Depression, Nausea/Vomiting, Migraines, Aches and Pains.

Lavender is applied to the skin for Pain and Hair Loss as well as to Repel Bugs. 

Some people add it to their Bathwater to Improve Mental Well Being through Aromatherapy.

Lavender is often used to Flavour Food, Cosmetics and Potpourri. 


Active Ingredients

Lavender contains Linalool, Linalyl Acetate, Terpinene-4-ol and Camphor.


How to Use

Use Lavender as Tea, Salve, Lotion, Oil or Aromatherapy.


Safety Concerns

Lavender is safe for us with everyone except for Pre-Pubescent Boys. The oil tends to disrupt the normal hormones resulting in Breast Growth. Best to avoid when Pregnant and Breast Feeding as well.


Click Here to Read the Plant Profile!

Lemon Balm


AKA

Balm, Honey Plant, Sweet Balm and Sweet Mary


Common Uses

Take orally for Digestive Problems, Aches, Pains and Several Mental Disorders.

Alzheimer's and Dementia patients use Lemon Balm to minimize anxiety.

People apply Lemon Balm topically to treat Cold Sores and to minimize Dementia in Alzheimer's patients.

Lemon Balm Oil is a common flavouring in Foods and Drinks.


Active Ingredients

Lemon Balm contains Rosmarinic Acid.


How to Use

Use Lemon Balm as Tea, Salve, Lotion, Oil or Aromatherapy.


Safety Concerns

Lemon Balm is safe for everyone to use but does have mild side effects such as nausea, vomiting, pain, dizziness and whizzing.


Click Here to Read the Plant Profile!

Peppermint



AKA

Black Peppermint, Peppermint Leaf, Western Peppermint


Common Uses

Take orally for Cough, Cold, Fever, Headache, Throat and Sinus Infections, Nausea, Heartburn, Vomiting, Diarrhea and IBS or GI Issues.

Peppermint Oil is applied topically for Aches, Pains and Inflammation, Bad Breath, Hot Flashes and Breast Cancer Treatments.

Aromatherapy treats Coughs and Colds, Reduce Stress and Improve Mental Function.

It's a commonly used Scent and Flavour used in the Food and Cosmetics Industries.


Active Ingredients

Peppermint contains the Essential Oils Menthol, Menthone and Limonene.


How to Use

Use Peppermint in Tea, as a Salve, Lotion, Oil or Aromatherapy.


Safety Concerns

Peppermint is safe for everyone but may cause Heartburn, Headache or Sore Mouth.


Click Here to Read the Plant Profile!

Mullein



AKA

American Mullein, Blanket Herb, Fluffweed and Torch Weed


Common Uses

Take orally for Cough, Cold, Bronchitis, Pneumonia, Ear Aches, Fever, Tonsilitis, Sore Throat, Asthma, Diarrhea, Migraines, Gout and Colic.

Mullein is used as a Sedative and Diuretic.

Industrially Mullein is commonly used to Flavour Alcoholic Beverages.


Active Ingredients

Mullein contains Saponins, Flavonoids and Phenylethanoid Glycosides.


How to Use

Use Mullein as Tea, Salve, Lotion or Oil.


Safety Concerns

Mullein is safe for us with everyone except Pregnant and Breast Feeding Women.


Click Here to Read the Plant Profile!


My recommendation for a list of must-haves would include Calendula, Cayenne, Chamomile, Peppermint, Garlic, Echinacea and Mullein! However, this is what works for my family and me! You'll have to decide what works best for you!


Hopefully, this guide has given you the required motivation to take your health a more natural route! If you'd like more information on a specific herb or think of anything to add to the list, please let me know HERE or feel free to leave a comment below.


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